Monday, November 8, 2010

Is MSG Disrupting Your Diet Success?

Monosodium glutamate, better known as MSG, is added to food because it just tastes so darned good. Eating MSG, however, may be interfering with your weight loss success.

MSG is the chemical associated with the taste sometimes called umami. MSG makes foods taste meaty. Cooking experts often refer to the taste of MSG as savory. MSG can literally make your mouth water, so it's added to an amazing variety of foods.

The third-named ingredient in McDonald's French fries, for example, is MSG. Almost all commercial soups and soup mixes contain MSG. This savory flavor inducer is known under an astonishing variety of names, including monosodium glutamate, MSG, hydrolyzed vegetable proteins, hydrolyzed yeast, autolyzed yeast, yeast extract, soy extract, "spices," protein isolate, and "natural flavorings."

A clinical research study published in March 2009 in the British Journal of Nutrition found that if the first part of your meal is made with MSG, you will eat 100 or 250 calories more during the second part of your meal, even if the second course is not made with MSG. If you start your meal with hot water and a bouillon cube, bouillon being mostly MSG, you will eat 100 to 250 calories more than if you hadn't.

If you start your meal with a bowl of canned soup, you will eat 100 to 250 calories more than if you hadn't. And, ironically, if you make your meal a bowl of cabbage soup following the recipes given out for most versions of the old cabbage soup diet, made with Lipton's soup mix, you will eat 100 to 250 calories more than if you hadn't.

If you are having trouble sticking to your diet, don't quit dieting. Read labels to make sure you are not getting MSG. Then see if it isn't a lot easier to stick to your low-calorie diet plan without feeling hungry all the time or eating too much every meal.

And if you really want to lose weight without feeling hungry all the time, read Bev's new book Eat to Beat the Belly Fat Blues.

No comments:

Post a Comment